Total video time in UK is 5 hours a day…unless you know different

I’m breaking my own rule: normally I only blog about one chart a year and this year’s chart was this bobby-dazzler. But sometimes a chart gives me such a pleading, data-driven look that I can’t resist its charms.

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Our annual graph: time-shifting isn’t ad avoiding

Graph. Go on, say it. Gargle with it. Give it a good old lick. Maybe even take it to bed with you, with its promise of hard facts and revealing truths. Graphs are what get me out of bed in the morning – that and a certain unnamed fear…

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If you watch that without me I’m divorcing you

The turn of the year is traditional time for taking stock and trying to get space to think. Thinking is something that in the media industry we like to “think” we do but it is a rare commodity as we hurtle from inbox to meeting to conference to home to bed to much-needed sleep perchance to dream. So what do I think about when given a bit of head space? Well TV viewing of course.

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Eric Schmidt’s missing chart

Schmidt Slide

Every year, we like to give you an enlightening chart; last year we gave you this one.

This year’s chart was partly inspired by Google’s Eric Schmidt and his recent gob-smacking claim that YouTube has ‘displaced’ watching TV.

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Repellently effective

The neuroscience clever-clogs from Neuro Insight visited Thinkbox the other day to reveal how our recent Harvey and Rabbit TV ad had been received by people’s brains (they’d monitored brain activity of people as they watched our ad – alongside several others). We knew from anecdotal evidence online and from direct feedback that our ad had been pretty well received, but Neuro Insight enabled us to see frame-by-frame what effects it had on people neurologically. It was very revealing.

However, I’m not going to go into the detail other than to say it seemed to push the right buttons. Its neurological performance echoed and explained the positive anecdotal feedback. Read more on Repellently effective…

Umming and ermine

Fresh new thinking from the second chamber – that’s the House of Lords, not the upstairs toilet. A new report has claimed there is an ‘overwhelming’ case for transferring TV content from broadcast to the internet, so that the spectrum currently used to broadcast TV can be used by mobile operators.

I salute the Lord’s probable thinking: let’s free up some space for all the mobile TV people will want to watch. Sensible stuff.

I also thought well done, Lords, you’ve appreciated a lot more than many people who work in the media industry: that TV is content and that there are a variety of different ways to deliver that content, one of which is the internet. Read more on Umming and ermine…

Social-wanging

The Collins Dictionary – a must read – has caused a bit of a storm by asking people to contribute new words for consideration via the internet (‘Mench’, apparently a shortened form of mention, has been suggested by someone who must be very short of time if they need to reclaim the nanosecond it takes to say ‘-tion’ ). I’d like to chuck ‘Social-wanging’ into the ring.

We already have ‘numberwanging’: using instantly impressive but ultimately meaningless numbers to try and make a point. Thinkbox has been, er, politely questioning this practice for some time. Social-wanging is similar – it often comes hand in hand with numberwanging – but funnier. It is easy to spot. A tell-tale sign is that it employs  perfectly reasonable words like curate, conversation, engagement, mash, journey, network…and mauls them into social service, often all at once in the same sentence (‘we need to curate the consumer journey to mash more digital conversations and engage the network). Read more on Social-wanging…

Spot the difference – 1957 vs. now

The one thing that HRH Queen Elizabeth II is probably most proud of in her now diamond-encrusted reign is, of course, the development of British TV over her reign into the world-class industry it is today.  Her coronation was the prompt for many British families to invest in their first TV set, so they could gather round and squint at tiny TV screens that the average tablet would now put to shame.  Three years of set growth later, and the jewel in HRH’s TV crown, commercial TV, was born in 1955.  She must be thrilled at how well it has performed since then.

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The Forgotten 34%

Would you trust research that ignored the views of a third of a country?  If we had a general election and prevented 34% of the country from voting would that be fair and representative?

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Our annual graph

Every year, here at Thinkbox HQ, we like to do at least one blog that features a single graph telling a clear, compelling story about TV. Yes, I know we really shouldn’t spoil you like this but we still have the generous, giving spirit of Christmas flowing through our veins along with the last dregs of the mulled wine and the final green triangle.

Read more on Our annual graph…

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